Inquiring Minds - Equal Protection and the Constitution

Constitution USAQ. You often hear people talk about the “equal protection clause” of the Constitution. What does that actually refer to?

A. After the Civil War, Congress passed the Fourteenth Amendment which guarantees “equal protection of the laws” to all “persons born or naturalized in the United States. In the Twentieth Century, this amendment (and in particular its equal protection clause) became the centerpiece of judicial efforts to promote civil rights and equal treatment for all Americans.

If you want to learn more about the idea of Equal Protection and other aspects of the U.S. Constitution, you’re invited to a discussion series at the Roseville Library this month.

Each Thursday evening through October 16, we’ll talk about an aspect of America’s fundamental document. We’ll watch segments of the award-winning PBS series Constitution USA with Peter Sagal to get the conversation started, and we’ll have a facilitator and a distinguished legal scholar to keep the discussions on track.

For more information, call Judy Woodward at the Roseville Library (651-724-6022) or visit our website
(Sources: West’s Encyclopedia of American Law and Library programs)

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