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Books in the News - 3/24/13

Ordinary GraceHere are the books reviewed in our local papers on the unspringlike first Sunday of spring:

At the Pioneer Press, we have:

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger - Krueger departs from his Cork O'Connor mystery series for this stand-alone, coming-of-age novel about a young man, a small town, and murder in the summer of 1961.  Mark your calendars!  William Kent Krueger will be appearing at the White Bear Lake branch on April 2nd at 6:30 p.m.

The Rockwell Heist by Bruce Rubenstein - In 1979 seven Norman Rockwell paintings and a supposed Renoir, later discovered to be a forgery, were stolen from Elayne's Gallery in Edina. It is still the biggest theft in Minnesota history, and no one was ever convicted for the crime. This is the story of the theft, the investigation, and the twenty-year quest to return the art to its rightful owners.

And in the Star Tribune Books section:Salt Sugar Fat

Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss - Traces the rise of the processed food industry and how addictive salt, sugar, and fat have enabled its dominance in the past half century, revealing deliberate corporate practices behind current trends in obesity, diabetes, and other health challenges.

101 Essential Rock Records: The Golden Age of Vinyl from the Beatles to the Sex Pistols by Jeff Gold

Maya's Notebook by Isabel Allende - Allende returns with a startling and surprising new book--a novel of suspense and a contemporary coming-of-age story narrated by an American teenage girl who falls into a life of drugs and crime and must escape before it's too late.  Don't forget:  Isabel Allende kicks off the spring season of Talking Volumes on May 8, 2013 at the Fitzgerald Theater.

Maya's NotebookPicking Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of New York City by Robin Nagle - One woman's journey inside New York City's grittiest--and most important--uniformed workforce. New York City produces more than 12,000 tons of household trash and recyclables a day. As quickly as it accumulates, it's hauled away. But "who" makes that happen?

The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout - The acclaimed author of "Olive Kitteridge" returns with a stunning novel as powerful and moving as any work in contemporary literature. Haunted by the freak accident that killed their father when they were children, the Burgess brothers are called home from their successful lives in New York.

Bringing Mulligan Home: The Other Side of the Good War by Dale Maharidge - Sgt. Steve Maharidge, like many of his generation, hardly ever talked about the war. After his death, his son Dale, now an adult, began a 12-year quest to understand his father's preoccupation with a certain photo from the war. What had happened during the battle for Okinawa, and why had his father remained silent about his experiences?Life After Life

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger - See above for description!  And get on the request list!  It's LONG.

Life After Life by Jill McCorkle - Life After Life is filled with a sense of wonder at our capacity for self-discovery at any age. And the residents, staff, and neighbors of the Pine Haven retirement center (from twelve-year-old Abby to eighty-five-year-old Sadie) share some of life’s most profound discoveries and are some of the most true-to-life characters that you are ever likely to meet in fiction.

Criminal Enterprise by Owen Laukkanen - From the outside, Carter Tomlin's life looks perfect: a big house, pretty wife, two kids. But Tomlin has a secret. He's lost his job, the bills are mounting, and that perfect life is hanging by a thread. Desperate, he robs a bank. Then he robs another. FBI special agent Carla Windermere and Minnesota state investigator Kirk Stevens reunite to solve the case.

Happy requesting and reading!

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